That Blonde Haired Teacher

You teach, I teach.

classroomcollective:

A place to put all the beautiful pictures your students give you throughout the year. Keep it on a shelf where the kids can also look at it, and you don’t have pictures everywhere!!!

classroomcollective:

A place to put all the beautiful pictures your students give you throughout the year. Keep it on a shelf where the kids can also look at it, and you don’t have pictures everywhere!!!

“If you would just get up and teach them instead of handing them a freaking packet, yo… There’s kids in here that don’t learn like that. They need to learn face to face. I’m telling you what you need to do… You want kids to come into your class, you want them to get excited for this? You gotta come in here, you gotta make them excited. You want a kid to change and start doing better? You gotta touch his freaking heart. You can’t expect a kid to change if all you do is just tell ‘em.”

—   Jeff Bliss to his teacher. (via radwst)

(via meatsix6)

classroomcollective:

Cause and Effect

classroomcollective:

Cause and Effect

(via revolutionizeed)

amiteachingyet:


Yup.
killsmedead:

lizznotliz:

gigidowns | courtenaybird:


The Get More Out of Google Infographic Summarizes Online Research Tricks for Students

I consistently forget these tricks. Now I have a visual. Thanks, Internet.


I wish I’d known this in undergrad.

Sending this to my coworkers on Monday.

killsmedead:

lizznotliz:

gigidowns | courtenaybird:

The Get More Out of Google Infographic Summarizes Online Research Tricks for Students

I consistently forget these tricks. Now I have a visual. Thanks, Internet.

image

I wish I’d known this in undergrad.

Sending this to my coworkers on Monday.

(via just-a-broadway-baby)

So far, so fantastic!

Hello fellow #education friends, peers, mentors, etc.

I am absolutely loving internship so far, and really… it is only my third day! My supervising teacher allowed me to do some “easy teaching” today…meaning, I basically gave a spelling test, went over it, and introduced some new vocabulary. It was awesome!

The group of fourth graders I have are FANTABULOUS! (I know, I know, it’s not a word, but that is how I feel about them!)

Anyway… I have a question for you all… 

I will be doing some remediation for the tier 2/3 students in math and reading (2-5 students per group, depending on the day). I want it to be informational, yes…but also, not “I’m falling asleep with my eyes open” boring. What types of interactive remediation activities have you tried/do you use in your classroom? 

The first two days..

…were actually quite good.

I really think I am going to love these forth graders. They all seem so bright and focused, and they are all very respectful, and for the most part have gotten all the procedures down, and it is only the second day.

As for me, this week was meant for me to just watch and listen, to get acclimated with the school/classroom/teacher/students. The layout of the school is crazy, but I figured it out. The classroom is set up pretty standard… white/smart board up from, teachers desk up front in the corner, six rows of four desks, and the back wall with two areas for centers/groups/remediation and a set of four computers. But it looks awesome! Like I said, the students seem great so far..and I’m excited to see what they can do later on in the semester.

And my teacher… Whoa! is she great.

Three things I’ve learned so far these past two days, just from watching my supervising teacher:

  1. Make an effort to establish two main ground rules: The first, that you are the teacher, and what you say, goes. The second, being that your classroom is a space where each student should feel comfortable and surrounded by friends, not enemies. While you want to establish the rules and procedures, I have seen that it is important for the teacher to reinforce the fact that it is okay to say “I don’t know” or “I don’t feel comfortable” or something along those lines. Students will feel less nervous, and will settle in quicker.
  2. The whole “Don’t smile until Christmas” thing is a little…extreme, if you will. Although, yes, you do need to be more stern at the beginning, the children will react better to someone who is smiling and laughing and making them laugh, too. If you are “not smiling” the whole day, if you are acting like a drill sergeant the whole day, then the children will become less likely to participate, and less likely to be engaged in conversations, whether academic or otherwise.
  3. The third and final thing I learned was that it is okay to be a little unprepared… Not so much unprepared as in, not having anything done, but more so in the sense that, you are allowed to forget something and remember it later, you are allowed to change that activity at the last minute, and it is okay to not remember everyone’s names by the end of the first day. You have to give yourself a break, and also remind yourself that it is your first day/week back, too. Don’t worry so much, it’ll be fine!

So, all in all, I’d say the first two days of internship went well, I’d say 9 out of 10. I don’t know if a day can ever be a 10 out of 10, but I think that’s a good thing.

How did everyone else’s first day(s) go? Any stories to share? Any words of wisdom to pass on to this rookie? :)

My top 5 [really practical] tips for first year teachers:

itssnix:

1. Don’t nap. You’ll find that teaching is exhausting. Always. And you’ll be tempted to come home and fall asleep immediately. What will happen, despite your best intentions, is that you’ll end up falling asleep for 3 hours, waking up at 7pm, and not being able to get up when your morning alarm goes off. Instead, go to bed early when you’re tired.

2. Write down everything. At the end of the day, write a note about what went well and what needed work. Found a random activity online and printed it last minute? Save it somewhere. Had a great learning moment with a student? Write it down. One of them said something hilarious? Write it down. 

You may think you’ll remember their comments, that sweet note you received, or the search terms you used to find that article. After all, student teaching is so vivid in your mind! You won’t. Trust me.
So write it down. [Also even if you never teach that curriculum again, you may run across a colleague who is. They’d love the resources!]

3. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Everyone knows you’re a first year teacher. They were all first year teachers too. Admitting you need help is not a quick ticket to a non-renewed contract, it’s a sign of maturity. Don’t know what to say in a parent letter? Ask for examples. Unsure if a student is just testing your limits or if there’s a serious issue? Ask a colleague who knows. Overwhelmed by the amount of grading to do? Find out the systems the veterans use. Let them help you - they’re teachers, that’s what they want to do.

4. Don’t be involved in the gossip, but don’t be the outcast. In every school there is a social hierarchy, even among teachers. Don’t try to plant yourself right in the middle. You aren’t a high schooler any more. If the “popular kids” are negative and gossipy, don’t let yourself be pulled down by themBut on the flip side, don’t always be a hermit. These are the colleagues who will take your carpool duty, help cover your classes, and offer meals when you’re sick. My encouragement is to eat at least one or two lunches a week with the big group, if you’re prone to being too much of a loner. If you’re prone to being involved in the drama, eat at least one or two lunches in your room. It’s a balance - you won’t hit it right, but you’ll be better off for trying.

5. Let yourself not be perfect. If you’re reading this, you’re probably involved in the #education community on Tumblr. That means you want to be a good teacher. No, a great teacher. And that’s awesome. Your students will be far better off with that sort of attitude.

But those lofty ambitions come with lots of disillusionment and discouragement. Things won’t be perfect and even though you know intellectually things won’t be perfect, it’ll still hit you like a ton of bricks. You might even question if you’re supposed to teach. When that comes, hang in there. Keep going. It’ll get better, and you’ll feel better and it will all be okay. And although you may be a good teacher at first, none of us are great teachers right away. So let yourself be a first year teacher, give yourself the grace to make mistakes, and keep moving forward.


Bonus: Love your students - relentlessly, faithfully, and well.

(Source: itsssnix, via sincerely-nobodyspecial)

soaking-it-in:

It’s my home away from home: my classroom!

It’s changed a bit from last year. I got fabric to cover my boards. I got a new whiteboard (that’s the one in the 2nd picture). I got another bookshelf (picture 4).

I suppose I’ll break these pictures down:

1: Front board. Our motto is “Work Hard, Play Hard.” so it goes up there. I’ve got my chevron labor of love podium and my magnets for what kids need to the left of the board. I like my 3M pocket thing that keeps my magnets on the wall for me. It makes changing them out super easy. To the right of my board is my island table where kids can work by themselves instead of in groups (their choosing or my choosing). There’s also a bucket o’ clipboards if students want to work on the floor or need to move up to the board to copy something down.

2: This is the wall to the right of picture 1. I’ve got my overstuffed teacher cabinet (I only have 1, and I have a lot of things!), my new library bungee chair, my new whiteboard, bookshelves, and just outside of the right side of the picture is my classroom door.

3: Poster I made for my classroom inspired by Pinterest/Twitter/other rooms. The spacing is a little wonky but it’ll do.

4: BOOKS! On top of this bookshelf we have the CD player (Harry Potter soundtrack hello!), the “returned books” basket so I can check to make sure they’re being checked in/out and put them back, and there’s one of my dying plants. 

5: Announcement board by the classroom door. I love this fabric. Right now I have my syllabus posted as well as the weekly homework. Each week I print out the homework for the week and add it on top of the previous week’s homework. By the end of the semester there will be about 18 sheets of paper there. It’s nice when a kid says, “But I didn’t know we were supposed to do that three weeks ago!” and I can flip back some pages and see it….

6: Back wall (opposite picture 1). From L to R: Wall of Shame cork board for grammar errors we spot around town/on the internet, hanging folders for returning student work (sorted alphabetically by class period because that’s how my gradebook is set up), black slots for students to turn in work by class period (they’re numbered on the right side of each tray), tools for student use: staplers, hole punchers, staple removers, and a sign for me to fill in what I’m currently reading. There are 2 pencil sharpeners on the table (one at each end).

7: My new direction sign. I measured the distances to the closest earthly distance from this city. Neverland is going up soon, but I had to measure that one in lightyears, not miles. 

(Source: teachinginthemiddle)

arielmarie:

This is going outside my door this year. Got the idea off of Pinterest, but it comes from The Inspired Classroom :)

arielmarie:

This is going outside my door this year. Got the idea off of Pinterest, but it comes from The Inspired Classroom :)